It’s common knowledge among Change Checkers that The Royal Mint strikes all the coins in the United Kingdom – and has done for centuries.

But what may come as a surprise to many collectors is The Royal Mint has historically struck coins for a variety of countries around the world!

Currently, outside of the UK, The Royal Mint provides services for over 60 different countries, including New Zealand and many Caribbean nations.

In the past, The Royal Mint has struck coins for North and South America, Africa and the Middle East!

In this blog, we take a look at our Top Five most interesting world coins struck by our very own UK Royal Mint and the stories behind them.


“From Norway to New Zealand, from Bermuda to Brunei, coins have been struck at The Royal Mint for countries all over the world.”

– The Royal Mint Museum


New Brunswick 1861 Half-Cent

Across the 18th and 19th centuries The Royal Mint, which was then based in London, minted several coins for North American states and the Caribbean.

Interestingly, in 1861 a half-cent coin, made of bronze, was minted for New Brunswick. More than 200,000 of these half-cent coins were struck, even though the denomination wasn’t actually needed.

It is said these coins were struck as a misunderstanding at The Royal Mint (that’s quite a misunderstanding!) and the majority of these were melted down. However, there has been reports that a lucky few coins have survived!

New Brunswick 1861 Half-Cent (Credit: The Royal Mint Museum Blog)

Norway 1942 25 Aurar

Many Change Checkers might be familiar with some of the coins struck by the UK Royal Mint throughout the Second World after reading our blog featuring coins struck in the UK for Iceland.

In addition to this a coinage was undertaken in the Second World War for the Norwegian government in anticipation of the country’s liberation from occupying forces.

Made out of Nickel-Brass and shipped to Norway ready for their liberation, this could have been one of the most exciting Norwegian coins in circulation.

However, the coin was never issued and the large majority of these were returned to The Royal Mint a few years later and melted down.

Norway 1942 25 Aurar (Credit: The Royal Mint Museum Blog)

Nigeria 1959 Shilling

This Nigerian Shilling was made out of Cupro-Nickel, the same composition we are familiar with on modern United Kingdom 50 pence coins.

With an order of more than 1,000 million pieces for this new, distinctive Nigerian coinage, this is by far the largest international coin order The Royal Mint had ever received – quite the honour!

Nigeria 1959 Shilling (Credit: The Royal Mint Museum Blog)

Hong Kong 1863 Mil

Introduced in 1863, the Hong Kong Mils were the first-ever perforated coins to be produced at The Royal Mint.

Perforated coins usually refer to coins which have a hole punched through the middle.

To date, although The Royal Mint have produced this style of coins for several other nations including East Africa, the United Kingdom has never had a perforated coin in their tender.

Hong Kong 1863 Mil (Credit: The Royal Mint Museum Blog)

Australia 1951 Penny

Demand for Australian coinage in 1951 exceeded the capacity of the Brand Mints in Melbourne and Perth, and so the UK Royal Mint was approached for assistance.

Interestingly, the Australian coinage pieces struck in London are distinguishable by the addition of the tiny letters ‘PL’ which recalls a mintmark used by the UK Mint in Roman times.

Australia 1951 Penny (Credit: The Royal Mint Museum Blog)

So, there we have it! Our Top Five most interesting coins struck by the UK Royal Mint for countries around the world!

These coins tell quite the story of The Royal Mint’s long and important history in world coinage.

If you have any exciting coins from around the world or stories you’d like to share, let us know in the comments below!  


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*** UPDATE ***

Following the Royal Proclamation on the 8th November, The Royal Mint have now confirmed there will be a Music Legends coin series!

It’s safe to assume Queen will be part of this series, but who else would you like to see on a Music Legends coin? Let us know in the comments below and sign up for updates at the bottom of the blog!


As of the Royal Proclamations issued on 8th November 2019, a very exciting United Kingdom £5 coin has been confirmed for 2020.

The reverse design is said to feature ‘a keyboard, drum, bass and electric guitar accompanied by a microphone and the inscription “QUEEN”‘.

This is the first time a band has been commemorated on a UK coin which makes this announcement particularly exciting.

At the moment, the designs are still top secret but you can fill in our sign-up form below to stay up-to-date with all the latest news about this release.

Stay up to date with all the latest Queen £5 news…

Fill in your details below to be kept up to date with all the latest news about the 2020 Queen £5 coin.

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If you’re interested in coin collecting, our Change Checker web app is completely free to use and allows users to:

– Find and identify the coins in their pocket
– Collect and track the coins they have
– Swap their spare coins with other Change Checkers

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On 6th June 1944, the D-Day Landings turned the tide of the Second World War.

Allied troops landed at five different beaches, famously codenamed: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword.

At these beaches, the largest amphibious assault in history was launched and this attack paved the way for the liberation of German-occupied France and is largely considered the start of the victory on the Western Front.

Most UK collectors will be familiar with the United Kingdom 75th Anniversary of D-Day £2 coin issued earlier this year to commemorate the historic event.

However, Allied Nations across the globe have been commemorating this important anniversary with unique coin issues from their very own Mints.

Today, we will be looking at the coins issued by Australia, Canada and Belgium, in addition to the UK £2, to see what this anniversary means to each country.  

United Kingdom £2

Over sixty-one thousand British Troops were deployed as part of the D-Day Operations, landing on the 6th June at Gold and Sword. What’s more, by 1944 over 2 million troops from over 12 countries were in Britain in preparation for the invasion.

To commemorate Britain’s great effort in opening up this second front against the German army, The Royal Mint issued a United Kingdom £2 coin for 2019.

This coin was produced in collaboration with Imperial War Museums and was designed by Stephen Taylor. Speaking about his work on the design, Taylor emphasises that he wanted to ‘build up the scale of the operation’ and that the ‘fonts are inspired by markings on US, Canadian and British landing craft, capturing the spirit of the international cooperation.’

2019 UK 75th Anniversary of D-Day £2

Canada $2

Operating within the British command structure, Canadian troops provided the third largest force for Allied operations in Western Europe. Landing at Juno, between British troops at Gold and Sword, over 21,000 Canadian troops were involved in the D-Day Landings.

The Canadians played a crucial role in the action that effectively ended the Normandy campaign a few months later, cutting off German forces at the Falaise gap.

To commemorate such a huge achievement, The Royal Canadian Mint issued a $2 coin, following their proud tradition of honouring Canada’s rich military history with commemorative $2 coins.  

The design, by Alan Daniel, features unique touches of selective colour to honour this most special anniversary.

2019 Canada 75th Anniversary of D-Day $2

Australia $1

On D-Day, over 2,000 Australian airmen took part in the battle of the skies above the invasion beaches, in addition to 500 Australian sailors serving in the escort fleets.

Notably, Australian officers held places in various British units throughout the campaign, gaining experience of British practises which they could then take home after the war.

Designed by Bronwyn King, the intricate design on this Australian $1 shows a flight of planes all heading in a single direction, with an Australian Kangaroo featured at the bottom.

2019 Australia 75th Anniversary of D-Day $1

Belgium 5 Euro

Although there are few recorded Belgium troops on 6th June D-Day Landings, Belgium soldiers played a key part in the Battle of Normandy, which followed the initial D-Day Landings operation.

What many people also don’t know is that the exiled Belgium government in the UK raised its own units in Britain, and Belgium pilots flew in the RAF.

Designed by Luc Luycx, this remarkable 5 euro features a map of Normandy with arrows pointing across to the beaches where troops landed on D-Day. The reverse of the coin shows a map of Europe with ‘Belgium’ in the country’s three languages: French, Dutch and German.

2019 Belgium 75th Anniversary of D-Day 5 Euro

A total of 156,000 Allied Troops took part in the D-Day Landings from across 12 countries – it truly was an international effort!


75th Anniversary of D-Day Allied Nations Coin Pack

To commemorate this most important anniversary year, Change Checker have brought together these four remarkable coins from four world-renowned Mints to create the Change Checker 75th Anniversary of D-Day Allied Nations Coin Pack.

Change Checker 75th Anniversary of D-Day Allied Nations Coin Pack

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