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Posts Tagged ‘Belgium’

D-Day commemorated by four world-renowned Mints

On 6th June 1944, the D-Day Landings turned the tide of the Second World War.

Allied troops landed at five different beaches, famously codenamed: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword.

At these beaches, the largest amphibious assault in history was launched and this attack paved the way for the liberation of German-occupied France and is largely considered the start of the victory on the Western Front.

Most UK collectors will be familiar with the United Kingdom 75th Anniversary of D-Day £2 coin issued earlier this year to commemorate the historic event.

However, Allied Nations across the globe have been commemorating this important anniversary with unique coin issues from their very own Mints.

Today, we will be looking at the coins issued by Australia, Canada and Belgium, in addition to the UK £2, to see what this anniversary means to each country.  

United Kingdom £2

Over sixty-one thousand British Troops were deployed as part of the D-Day Operations, landing on the 6th June at Gold and Sword. What’s more, by 1944 over 2 million troops from over 12 countries were in Britain in preparation for the invasion.

To commemorate Britain’s great effort in opening up this second front against the German army, The Royal Mint issued a United Kingdom £2 coin for 2019.

This coin was produced in collaboration with Imperial War Museums and was designed by Stephen Taylor. Speaking about his work on the design, Taylor emphasises that he wanted to ‘build up the scale of the operation’ and that the ‘fonts are inspired by markings on US, Canadian and British landing craft, capturing the spirit of the international cooperation.’

D-Day commemorated by four world-renowned Mints
2019 UK 75th Anniversary of D-Day £2

Canada $2

Operating within the British command structure, Canadian troops provided the third largest force for Allied operations in Western Europe. Landing at Juno, between British troops at Gold and Sword, over 21,000 Canadian troops were involved in the D-Day Landings.

The Canadians played a crucial role in the action that effectively ended the Normandy campaign a few months later, cutting off German forces at the Falaise gap.

To commemorate such a huge achievement, The Royal Canadian Mint issued a $2 coin, following their proud tradition of honouring Canada’s rich military history with commemorative $2 coins.  

The design, by Alan Daniel, features unique touches of selective colour to honour this most special anniversary.

D-Day commemorated by four world-renowned Mints
2019 Canada 75th Anniversary of D-Day $2

Australia $1

On D-Day, over 2,000 Australian airmen took part in the battle of the skies above the invasion beaches, in addition to 500 Australian sailors serving in the escort fleets.

Notably, Australian officers held places in various British units throughout the campaign, gaining experience of British practises which they could then take home after the war.

Designed by Bronwyn King, the intricate design on this Australian $1 shows a flight of planes all heading in a single direction, with an Australian Kangaroo featured at the bottom.

D-Day commemorated by four world-renowned Mints
2019 Australia 75th Anniversary of D-Day $1

Belgium 5 Euro

Although there are few recorded Belgium troops on 6th June D-Day Landings, Belgium soldiers played a key part in the Battle of Normandy, which followed the initial D-Day Landings operation.

What many people also don’t know is that the exiled Belgium government in the UK raised its own units in Britain, and Belgium pilots flew in the RAF.

Designed by Luc Luycx, this remarkable 5 euro features a map of Normandy with arrows pointing across to the beaches where troops landed on D-Day. The reverse of the coin shows a map of Europe with ‘Belgium’ in the country’s three languages: French, Dutch and German.

D-Day commemorated by four world-renowned Mints
2019 Belgium 75th Anniversary of D-Day 5 Euro

A total of 156,000 Allied Troops took part in the D-Day Landings from across 12 countries – it truly was an international effort!


75th Anniversary of D-Day Allied Nations Coin Pack

To commemorate this most important anniversary year, Change Checker have brought together these four remarkable coins from four world-renowned Mints to create the Change Checker 75th Anniversary of D-Day Allied Nations Coin Pack.

D-Day commemorated by four world-renowned Mints
Change Checker 75th Anniversary of D-Day Allied Nations Coin Pack

The end of an era for Belgium’s Royal Mint

After 185 years of production, The Royal Mint of Belgium is set to close forever.

The Royal Mint of Belgium struck its first coins in 1832, just two years after the institution was founded, but the long standing mint will cease operations forever on January 1st 2018.

From the end of the 1990’s the Belgian Mint started producing euro coins ready for the switch from the Belgian Franc to the euro at the start of 2002. And the nation considers itself one of the pioneers with regards to the introduction of the euro as it was Belgian chief engraver Luc Luycks who  designed the obverse side of all euro coins.

Unfortunately the Federal Government feels it has become too expensive for the Royal Mint to carry on producing coins itself and has decided that a private company should produce Belgian euro coins. And with more and more people paying electronically there is less and less need for coins.

Instead, the task of striking coins is being outsourced to a private company in an effort to save money.

The Royal Belgium Mint caused a stir back in 2015 when they issued a €2.50 coin to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo after France forced it to scrap a €2 coin with the same purpose.Tweet

Paris objected to the Belgian coin, commemorating the French emperor’s defeat by British and Prussian forces, branding the commemoration of Waterloo as a “symbol that is negative” which would “undermine the unity of the Eurozone.”

Belgium was forced to get rid of about 180,000 €2 coins that had already been minted after Paris sent a letter saying they could cause an “unfavourable reaction in France”.

But Belgium managed to skirt the French protests by taking advantage of a European rule stating that Eurozone countries are permitted to approve their own coins without approval of other member states, providing the new denomination as an irregular one. In this case the irregular denomination was €2.50.

The Royal Belgium Mint strikes more than 40 million coins a year  but the final batch of commemorative coins have now been minted, ready to close its doors in just over a month.

The end of an era for Belgium's Royal Mint

The last coins ever struck at The Royal Belgian Mint – issued to celebrate the 200th Anniversary of Ghent University.

The last coins ever struck at The Royal Belgian Mint were the special €2 coins issued to celebrate the 200th Anniversary of Ghent University.

The special coin features an engraved logo of the University of Ghent with the dates 1817-2017. The Belgian mintmark, a helmeted head of the archangel Michel, as well as the mintmaster mark, the armorial bearings of Herzele city, are located respectively on the right and on the left of issuing country indication ‘BE’ (meaning Belgium). The12 stars of the European flag are represented on the external ring of the coin.


Own the last coin struck at the Royal Mint of Belgium – limited availability

The end of an era for Belgium's Royal MintWe have been able to secure a very limited number of the last ever coins struck at the Royal Mint of Belgium Mint

They are available now for just £15.95. Click here to reserve yours >>

Belgium wins Battle of Waterloo with new €2.50 coin

In March we shared a story on our Facebook page about a new €2 coin proposed by Belgium to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo in this, its bicentenary year. France made it very clear they would not welcome any such design, branding the commemoration of Waterloo as a “symbol that is negative” which would “undermine the unity of the Eurozone.”

This caused more than a little grievance with Belgium, who had already struck around 180,000 €2 coins ready for circulation, prior to receiving the veto letter from Paris.

Now, in an unprecedented and surprisingly provocative move, Belgium has moved to defy France and issue a new coin which takes advantage of a European rule stating that Eurozone countries are permitted to approve their own coins without approval of other member states, providing the new denomination is an irregular one.

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The story of the new €2.50 coin was widely covered in the media

In this case the irregular denomination is €2.50.

The reverse design features the Lion’s Mound monument which currently stands at the Waterloo battlefield, as well as lines indicating the position of the troops.

Napoleon Bonaparte’s defeat and ultimate exile in 1815 still leaves a bitter taste with the French, but Belgium have denied acting antagonistically.

Belgian finance minister, Johan Van Overtveldt, defended the new coin by emphasising the magnitude of the occasion; “There’s been no battle in in recent history as important as Waterloo, or indeed one that captures the imagination in the same way.”

Regardless of intent, the new coin has caused quite a stir, with the story being picked up by the worldwide media.

There are only 70,000 new coins which will all be legal tender in Belgium, but it is thought that collectors will be very quick to snap them up considering the controversy over their release.


Waterloo Coin

** Unfortunately this has now SOLD OUT **

LIMITED AVAILABILITY

We have been able to secure a very limited number of the new Waterloo €2.50 coin from Europe.

They are available now for just £9.99, however, we are expecting them to sell out in record time – so please be quick to reserve yours!