Here’s where you can find the new King Charles III Banknotes…

The new King Charles III Banknotes entered circulation on 5th June 2024, and collectors have been rushing to secure the ones with the lowest serial number. The branch manager at Sunderland City Post Office even said people were queueing waiting for their doors to open on 5th June to get their hands on the new notes.

King Charles III £5, £10 and £20 banknotes
King Charles III £5, £10 and £20 banknotes

Only a select few places are stocking the King Charles III banknotes, so far so here’s where you can get your hands on them…

Post Offices 

  • Sunderland City, SR1, 1RR
  • The City of London, EC2M 5TE
  • Moorgate, EC2M 5TE
  • Broadway, SW1H 0AX
  • Houndsditch, E1 7BS
  • Piccadilly Plaza in Manchester, M2 1BB
  • Portsmouth, PO1 1AB
  • Birmingham, B2 4AA
  • Great Massingham, PE31 6HP
  • Tetbury, GL8 8DB
  • Minchinhampton, GL6 9BN
  • Windsor, SL4 1AA
  • Woodstock, OX20 1SP
  • Poundbury, DT1 3AZ

The Bank of England Counter

  • Threadneedle Street, London, EC2R 8AH – The counter will be issuing new King Charles III banknotes from 5th June to 11th June 2024 with a limit of £300 per customer.

Bank of England Postal Exchange Service

  • You can obtain King Charles III banknotes using the Bank of England’s postal exchange service from 5th June to 30th June 2024 with a limit of £300 per customer.
    Apply for postal exchange service here >>

If you’ve managed to get your hands on a King Charles III banknote, let us know where in the comments!


A closer look at the first ever King Charles III Banknotes

Find out everything you need to know about the new banknotes and their special security features by reading our blog >>

First King Charles III Banknotes ENTER CIRCULATION!

The first banknotes featuring King Charles III entered circulation today (5th June 2024), here’s everything you need to know.

King Charles III Banknotes
Credit: Bank of England

Hot off the press

In November 2023, The Bank of England started printing new banknotes featuring King Charles III at a rate of 6 million in 24 hours. The delay in them entering circulation was apparently caused by machines such as self service tills not being able to recognise the new image and needing to be recalibrated.

King Charles III banknotes in production
Credit: Bank of England Flickr
King Charles III banknotes in production
Credit: Bank of England Flickr

The Bank of England’s chief cashier, Sarah John, said “There is a lot to do to ensure that machines used up and down the country can accept the banknotes. They all need to be adapted to recognise the new design, with software updates, and that takes months and months. Otherwise, we will be putting a banknote out there that people simply would not be able to use.”


A sustainable transition

Taking guidance from the Royal Household, the new banknotes will only be issued to replace worn or damaged Queen Elizabeth II notes, meaning both monarchs’ portraits will co-circulate for the foreseeable future.

There are approximately 4.7 billion Queen Elizabeth II banknotes currently in circulation, worth an estimated £82 billion, so don’t worry – they’ll still be accepted in shops as well as the new King Charles III notes.

This transition phase will minimise the environmental and financial impact of the change, in keeping with the King’s vision for a more sustainable future.

King Charles III’s portrait will now appear on the front of the notes, an image based on an engraving of a picture of His Majesty taken in 2013, however there will be no changes to the current reverse designs:

  • Winston Churchill (£5)
  • Jane Austen (£10)
  • JMW Turner (£20)
  • Alan Turing (£50)
King Charles III £5, £10, £20 and £50 banknotes
King Charles III £5, £10, £20 and £50 banknotes
Credit: Bank of England

Security Features

All denominations of the new banknotes share some of the same security features which you can use to verify the authenticity of the note.

Monarch’s portrait in a see-through window
A portrait of King Charles III is printed on the window with the denomination and ‘Bank of England’ printed twice around the edge.

Hologram Image Change
When tilting the note from side to side, the word within the hologram should change between the value of the note, ‘Five’, ‘Ten’, ‘Twenty’ or ‘Fifty’ and ‘Pounds’.

Silver foil patch
A silver foil patch contains a 3D image of the coronation crown.

Print Quality
The printed lines and colours on the note are sharp and clear, with no smudges or blurred edges. If you use a magnifying glass, you should be able to see the value of the note written in small letters and numbers below the monarch’s portrait.

Feel of polymer and raised print
The note is printed on polymer, a thin and flexible plastic. On the front of the note, you can feel the raised print on the words ‘Bank of England’ and in the bottom right corner.

Ultraviolet number
Under a UV light, the denomination number appears in bright green and red on the front of the note.

£5 features

Here are some security features specific to the £5 notes.

King Charles III £5 Note with security features
King Charles III £5 Note with security features

Colour changing border
When the note is tilted, a coloured border around the edge of the see-through window and the ‘£’ symbol inside the window will change from purple to green.

Green foil patch
On the other side of the silver foil patch showing the coronation crown, the £5 has a green foil patch featuring the word ‘BLENHEIM’.

£10 features

Here are some security features specific to the £10 notes.

King Charles III £10 Note with security features
King Charles III £10 Note with security features

Colour changing quill
When the £10 note is tilted, a coloured quill at the side of the see-through window will change from purple to orange.

Copper foil patch
On the other side of the silver foil patch showing the coronation crown, the £10 has a copper foil patch containing the letters ‘JA’ within an open book, representing Jane Austen.

£20 features

Here are some security features specific to the £20 notes.

King Charles III £20 Note with security features
King Charles III £20 Note with security features

A second see-through window
In the bottom right corner of the front of the £20 note, there is a second, smaller see-through window containing the number 20.

Purple foil patch
On the other side of the silver foil patch showing the coronation crown, the £20 has a purple foil patch containing the letter ‘T’ for JMW Turner.

£50 features

Here are some security features specific to the £50 notes.

King Charles III £50 Note with security features
King Charles III £50 Note with security features

A second see-through window
In the bottom right corner of the front of the £50 note, there is a second, smaller see-through window containing the number 50.

Hologram change
The £50 note has two gold foil squares on the front, and the images within should change between ‘50’ and the ‘£’ symbol when the note is tilted.

Red foil patch
On the other side of the silver foil patch showing the coronation crown, the £50 has a red foil patch containing the letters ‘AT’, paying tribute to Alan Turing who features on the note.


A closer look


Where can I find a King Charles III banknote?

Eventually, we’ll start to see King Charles III banknotes crop up in our cash, but as their introduction will be a gradual process, some collectors may not want to wait to get their hands on one.

King Charles III notes
King Charles III notes
Credit: Bank of England

The Bank of England are running a postal exchange service, where from 5th to 30th June 2024, you can send in your current or old series banknotes and they’ll return King Charles III banknotes to you in exchange. 

You can also visit The Bank of England counter at Threadneedle Street where they’ll only only be issuing new banknotes featuring King Charles III from 5th to 11th June 2024. From 12th June 2024, the Bank’s counter will revert to issuing Queen Elizabeth II banknotes only. 

Found one in circulation already? Let us know where in the comments!


Safely store your new banknotes

With the release of these new banknotes, now’s the perfect time to start your banknote collection, by owning the Change Checker Polymer Banknote Collecting Pack – with space to securely house all four of England’s polymer banknotes!

Secure yours for just £9.99 (+p&p) >>

Queen Camilla represents King Charles III at this year’s Royal Maundy Service

Maundy Thursday is an Easter tradition dating back to 1622, when Charles II was the reigning monarch. The tradition usually involves the monarch gifting members of the public coins as part of a special ceremony, however this year will be a bit different…

King Charles III and Queen Camilla at York Minster Maundy Service 2023
Credit: The Royal Family on Twitter

On behalf of The King

The annual Royal Maundy Service will take place today at Worcester Cathedral, where Her Majesty The Queen will be distributing the Royal Maundy gifts on behalf of His Majesty The King.

Queen Camilla will be accompanied by Lord High Almoner, Bishop John as the gifts are presented. He said: “It is an honour to be able to welcome HM The Queen to Worcester. This is an immensely special service and I know it will mean a huge amount to those who have been chosen to receive the coins, all of whom will have given years of service to their local communities.”

This isn’t the first time the Maundy Service has been hosted by someone other than the reigning monarch. In 2022, King Charles (then Prince) represented Queen Elizabeth II at the Royal Maundy Service at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor. It was believed to be only the fifth time during her reign that Queen Elizabeth II did not attend the service, including its cancellation due to Covid in 2020 and 2021.

Prince Charles attended the 2022 Royal Maundy Service in Windsor on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II
Credit: Jason Pix

What coins are awarded?

Ceremonial coins will be presented to 75 men and 75 women specially chosen in recognition of the service they have given to the Church and local community.

Each recipient will be gifted two small leather string purses – one white, one red. The red purse contains ordinary coinage as money (in lieu of the food and clothing that was offered years ago), and the white purse contains specially minted silver Maundy coins with a collective face value of 75p (representing The King’s age).

2023 Red Maundy Money Pouch
Credit: The Royal Family on Twitter

Last year, among the coins in the red purse were the 2023 King’s 75th Birthday £5 and the 2023 Windrush Generation 50p – both of which featured in the 2023 Annual Coin Set. Considering this, it’s possible that commemorative coins from the 2024 Annual Coin Set may be included in this year’s offerings.


The History of Royal Maundy

Maundy Thursday is a key day during the Easter week which commemorates Jesus Christ’s last supper on the day before his crucifixion.

The Royal Maundy Church service takes place each year on this day, and is inspired by the generosity shown by Jesus in washing the feet of his disciples shortly before his death.

Jesus washing the feet of disciples.
Credit: Regina magazine

Its origins can be traced back to the Middle Ages, when English monarchs would wash the feet of beggars and offer gifts of food and clothing in imitation of Jesus.

However it was King John who was the first to give to the poor on Maundy Thursday and by the early 14th century, it had become customary for the sovereign to provide a meal, together with gifts of food and clothing.

Sharing the Wealth

For numismatists, the day has added significance in the form of Maundy money, which is given out by the reigning monarch each year at the service.

1985 Silver Maundy Coins
Credit: Wehwalt via Wikimedia Commons

The tradition of giving out money began with Charles II, with the first set of Maundy coins consisting of a four penny, three penny, two penny and a penny. The coins have remained in much the same form since then, and are traditionally struck in sterling silver.


Have you or anyone you know ever received Maundy Money for your services? Let us know in the comments below!


Kick start your King Charles III collection with the New UK Coinage Set

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