Back in 1962, the very first James Bond film saw the iconic British spy brought to life on the big screen and now, just as the 25th film is due to be released, The Royal Mint have issued a collection of brand new Bond themed £5 coins!

The first coin has just been released and is sure to create a stir in the coin collecting world…

Designed as a collaboration between Christian Davies and Matt Dent (partners from graphic design agency, Bison Bison), the first coin features the classic Bond car from Goldfinger – the Aston Martin DB5.

Dent commented on the design process, saying, “As Bond fans ourselves, we’ve enjoyed re-watching some of our favourite films. The design series focuses on iconic imagery from the Bond films. Finding the balance between design detail and what can be accomplished in production was a challenge, nowhere more so than the intricate spokes of the DB5’s wheel.

0 0 7

You’ll notice that the first coin also features the number ‘0’ on the reverse design.

When all three coins are placed together, the famous ‘007’ motif will be spelt out – completing this classic collection.

Whilst the second and third coins haven’t been released yet, they will be available later in the year.

The second coin is set to feature a legendary Bond car, the submarine Lotus Espirit S1 from The Spy Who Loved Me, known as ‘Wet Nellie’. An inscription will also feature on the coin, saying ‘Pay attention 007′.

Finally, the last coin in the series will feature a timeless depiction of James Bond, showing his torso in a dinner jacket and bow tie. The inscription on this coin will read the iconic James Bond line, ‘Shaken not stirred’ in reference to the spy’s preferred style of Martini.

The History of James Bond

The character ‘James Bond’ was first brought to life in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming who created twelve novels and two short-story collections featuring the British Secret Service agent.

However, it was in 1962 that Bond first appeared on the big screen.

From ‘Dr No’ to ‘No Time To Die’, the character has appeared in a remarkable 25 films, with endless gadgets and iconic imagery from the films now recognised world-wide.

James Bond actors. Credit: 007.com

During the film series’ 58 year history, the suave secret agent has been portrayed by six different actors, and I’m sure we all have our own favourite ‘Bond’.

Currently played by Daniel Craig, the upcoming film will represent his fifth and final time starring as the MI6 agent codenamed 007.

The luxurious lifestyle, spectacular gadgets and dramatic vehicles have delighted audiences for generations and I’m sure Bond fans will be blown away to see their favourite film series celebrated on £5 coins.

Not the first James Bond themed UK coin…

Bond first appeared on UK coinage in 2018 with the release of the A-Z of Great Britain 10ps.

Naturally, Bond was chosen to represent the letter B as a quintessentially British icon.

This 10p has proven incredibly popular with collectors and has since not only worked its way to the top of the Change Checker Scarcity Index, but has remained on the top spot for the last few updates – confirming the popularity of this coin.

With the release of the brand new James Bond themed £5 coins in this special year celebrating the 25th Bond film, will we see a rise in the demand for Bond themed collectibles?

We certainly think these coins will make for an exciting set to add to your collection, but what do you think about the new Bond £5? Let us know in the comments below!


Add the Brand New Bond £5 to your collection!

You can now secure the first Bond £5 in superior Brilliant Uncirculated quality – what better way to match the luxurious lifestyle of the suave secret agent?

Click here to secure your coin today.

Today is Prince Philip’s 98th birthday, an extraordinary milestone by all accounts, and so we’ve taken a look back at some of the coins issued to commemorate key moments throughout his life.

Born in Corfu in 1921, he is actually the oldest living great-grandchild of Queen Victoria. Prince Philip was born into the Greek royal family but his family was exiled from Greece when he was a child.

In 1939 he began corresponding with Princess Elizabeth, and after World War II he was granted permission by the King to marry her.

Prince Philip’s life of royal service began at the Queen’s accession in 1952 and he has since become the longest-serving consort in British history and the oldest-ever male member of the British Royal family.

Credit: www.royal.uk

2007 Diamond Jubilee £5

In 2007, Her Majesty the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh celebrated their Diamond Wedding Anniversary, a remarkable 60 years of marriage.  

A remarkable milestone that seems to have been forgotten...
2007 Diamond Jubilee £5. Click here to find out more about this coin.

Due to this massive milestone and a truly proud moment for them both, the Royal Mint issued a new £5 coin.

Designed by Emma Noble, the reverse beautifully depicts the Rose Window at Westminster Abbey. This highly sought after coin is the only UK coin to feature the conjoined portrait of the Queen and Prince Philip.

2011 90th Birthday of Prince Philip £50

In 2011 a UK £5 coin was issued by The Royal Mint in celebration of the 90th birthday of Prince Philip.

The Royal Mint has just announced the release of a brand new UK Prince Philip coin
2011 90th birthday of Prince Philip £5. Click here to find out more about the coin.

The coin’s design features a specially commissioned portrait of Philip by Mark Richards FRBS. 

Excitingly, just 18,730 of these coins were struck in Brilliant Uncirculated presentation packs making it one of the rarest £5 coins ever. And because of this, the coin is extremely sought after by collectors and is virtually impossible to get hold of on the secondary market.

2017 Prince Philip 70 Years of Service £5

In 2017, The Royal Mint released a brand new UK coin paying tribute to Prince Philip and his 70 years of service.

2017 70 Years of Service £5. Click here to find out more about this coin.

On 4th May 2017, Buckingham Palace announced that Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh would be retiring from public duty. This marked an incredible 70 years of service to the Queen, the United Kingdom, British Isles and the Commonwealth.

As well as a Base Metal coin, a very limited number of Silver Proof coins were made available, with just 3,000 coins being struck. Unsurprisingly, this coin was quick to sell out at The Royal Mint and with their distributors.

Did you know he worked with the Royal Mint?

In 1952, The Duke of Edinburgh was appointed President of the Royal Mint Advisory Committee. His role included selecting the design of coins, medals and seals for the new reign of Her Majesty the Queen.

He worked with the Royal Mint right up to his retirement in 1999 so it’s fair to say that the coins we know and love from years gone by, were specially selected by Prince Philip.


Secure the 2017 Prince Philip 70 Years of Service £5 coin

Whilst the Silver Proof version of this coin was quick to sell out, you still have the opportunity to get your hands on the Base Metal £5 coin in CERTIFIED BU quality.

Click here to secure the Brilliant Uncirculated Prince Philip 70 Years of Service £5 coin.

Alexandrina Victoria was born on 24th May 1819. At just 18 years old she acceded to the throne and ruled Britain for 63 years, making her Britain’s longest reigning monarch at the time of her death in 1901.

Victoria oversaw the extensive growth and expansion of the British Empire under her rule, with dramatic changes in British culture, industry, and technology. These changes had a significant influence on the development and spread of British coinage.

Victorian currency was minted throughout the world in countries such as India and Australia, as well as Britain. Every coin and portrait tells a unique story – from the ‘Young Head’ which depicted a promising Queen, right through to the ‘Old Head’ which represented an ageing but graceful monarch.

In this blog, we’ll explore the defining coins of Queen Victoria’s reign, as well as taking a look at the modern commemorative coins we see today, issued to celebrate one of Britain’s most influential monarchs.

The defining coins of Queen Victoria’s Reign

1838 Sovereign

1838 Sovereign

The first Sovereign of Queen Victoria’s rule was issued in 1838 with the popular Young Head portrait by William Wyon. The portrait had a particularly youthful look, one that was favoured by Victoria and contributed to the coin’s popularity throughout her reign. To this day, it is the longest a portrait has featured on our circulating coinage, having been issued on bronze coins up until 1895. The Young Head effigy is considered the most favoured portrait of Victoria’s coinage, undergoing only minor changes throughout its lifespan.

Godless Florin

1849 ‘Godless’ Florin

As part of the move towards decimalisation, a coin valued at 1/10th of a pound, the Florin, was introduced in 1849. It featured the Gothic Head portrait by William Wyon which would actually go on to be regarded as one of the most beautiful representations of the Victorian age. However, this coin failed to include the term ‘Dei Gratia’, which earned it the nickname of the Godless Florin. It was swiftly withdrawn from circulation after three years.  

Gothic Florin

Gothic Florin

The Gothic Florin was introduced as a replacement to the Godless Florin and contained a very similar design, but this coin included the term ‘Dei Gratia’. This particular portrait represents the revival of Gothic culture across Victorian life and draws its name from the distinct gothic font used for the inscription around the edge, and the intricate detail on the crown that Victoria wears, which is considered a numismatic masterpiece. As the second Florin to promote decimalisation, the Gothic Florin again failed to gain popularity but was minted for longer than its predecessor.

Click here to own a genuine Queen Victoria Silver Florin

1855 Sydney Sovereign

1855 Sydney Sovereign

As part of British imperial expansion, the Royal Mint opened a branch in Sydney and the first Sovereign was minted there in 1855. It had the word ‘Australia’ printed on the reverse and bore a small ‘S’ mintmark to distinguish it as having been minted in Australia.  This portrait was only ever seen on Australian coins, produced exclusively at the Sydney Mint for just 14 years. It depicted a younger queen with a sprig of banksia (an Australia plant) weaved into her hair, which gave it a distinct Australian feel.

Double Florin

Double Florin

The Double Florin, in another move towards decimalisation, was valued at 1/5th of a pound and pictured the Jubilee Head. The coin was only 2mm smaller than the Crown but valued at a Shilling less, making it difficult to distinguish between the two. Issued between 1887 and 1890, it is one of the shortest circulating coins in British history. The coin was famously nicknamed the ‘Barmaid’s Ruin’, as tavern maids mistook the coin for a Crown, causing the tavern to lose money and the maid to lose their job!

1901 Sovereign

1901 Sovereign

The final Sovereign of Queen Victoria’s rule depicted the Old Head portrait by Thomas Brock, showing an elegant Queen in her mourning attire. Victoria’s veil had become integral to her image since the death of her husband in 1861, right up until her final years. This is one of the most famous images of Victoria and features on the final sovereign of her reign, issued in 1901 at the end of the Victorian era and the start of a new century.

Modern commemorative coins

Almost 150 years after the birth of Queen Victoria and 120 years after the initial move towards decimalisation, the first decimal coins entered circulation in Britain. The 5p and 10p coins were released in 1968, followed by the 50p coin in 1969.

From the modern coinage we see today, two commemorative £5 coins have been issued in Queen Victoria’s honour.

Death of Queen Victoria 100th anniversary

2001 Queen Victoria £5

The death of Queen Victoria in January 1901 marked the end of an era which has left its mark on the modern world. Her reign was remarkable for the extraordinary progress in industry, technology, arts and sciences and the expansion of the British Empire. This coin was issued to mark 100 years since her death and the end of the Victorian era. The reverse by Mary Milner-Dickens reproduces the profile of Victoria by William Wyon against the background of the Crystal Palace exhibition of 1851.

Birth of Queen Victoria 200th anniversary

2019 Queen Victoria £5

Under Queen Victoria’s reign, The British Empire became a superpower during an era of peace and prosperity. Designed by John Bergdahl, the reverse of this coin, issued to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria, features a portrait of Queen Victoria with the dates 1819 – 2019 alongside a steam train, large sailing ship, telephone, and penny farthing. Each element appears in a mechanical circle to represent the incredible inventions of the Victorian period.

Of all the monarchs, Victoria’s reign seems to have captured the imagination of the public more than any other. The coins issued throughout her reign and into the modern age reflect her extraordinary life and rule.


Celebrate the 200th Anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria

This brand new UK £5 coin has been struck to a superior Brilliant Uncirculated quality and is protectively encapsulated in official Change Checker packaging to ensure that it is preserved for generations.

Click here to secure the coin for your collection