***BREAKING NEWS***

The first coin in The Royal Mint’s Music Legends £5 series has just been released, and this £5 is sure to rock you…

For the first time ever, QUEEN feature on a brand new UK coin!

2020 UK Queen £5

The Show Must Go On

As one of Britain’s most iconic and influential bands ever, Queen’s unique sound quickly propelled them to global stardom!

The band was formed in London in 1970 and released their debut album in 1973.

From one hit to another, Queen rocked the nation and became a British icon, creating unique and timeless songs which are still loved to this day.

And as of 2005, Queen albums have spent a total of 1,322 weeks on the UK Album Charts – equating to twenty-six years (according to the Guinness Book of World Records).

2020 Queen £5 Coin

To celebrate these true music legends, a brand new Queen £5 coin has been released by The Royal Mint.

2020 UK Queen £5

The £5 coin features a design by Chris Facey, showcasing the iconic instruments of all four founder members of the band: Britain May’s Red Special guitar, John Deacon’s Fender Precision Bass™, Roger Taylor’s Ludwig™ bass drum, and Freddy Mercury’s Bechstein™ grand piano.

But my favourite part of this coin design has got to be the grand piano with the opening notes of Queen’s world-famous anthem Bohemian Rhapsody pressed down.

Band members Brian May and Roger Taylor have officially approved the design of this £5 coin and this, alongside the fact that the coin is full of numismatic firsts, is sure to make it particularly sought-after amongst collectors:

  • The first-time ever Queen have featured on a coin worldwide
  • The first-time ever a British band has been celebrated on UK coinage
  • The first in an exciting new series celebrating British music legends

I’m sure you’re just as excited as we are by this brand new coin release and the start of the Music Legends £5 series. Who do you think will appear on the next coin in the series? Let us know in the comments below!


A genuine numismatic first – secure yours today

As you would expect with a coin this exciting, your brand new UK £5 has been struck to superior Brilliant Uncirculated quality and protectively encapsulated in official Change Checker packaging to preserve its quality forever.

Become part of British history and secure the first-ever Queen £5 coin for your collection right now by clicking here.

*** UPDATE ***

Following the Royal Proclamation on the 8th November, The Royal Mint have now confirmed there will be a Music Legends coin series!

It’s safe to assume Queen will be part of this series, but who else would you like to see on a Music Legends coin? Let us know in the comments below and sign up for updates at the bottom of the blog!


As of the Royal Proclamations issued on 8th November 2019, a very exciting United Kingdom £5 coin has been confirmed for 2020.

The reverse design is said to feature ‘a keyboard, drum, bass and electric guitar accompanied by a microphone and the inscription “QUEEN”‘.

This is the first time a band has been commemorated on a UK coin which makes this announcement particularly exciting.

At the moment, the designs are still top secret but you can fill in our sign-up form below to stay up-to-date with all the latest news about this release.

Stay up to date with all the latest Queen £5 news…

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Alexandrina Victoria was born on 24th May 1819. At just 18 years old she acceded to the throne and ruled Britain for 63 years, making her Britain’s longest reigning monarch at the time of her death in 1901.

Victoria oversaw the extensive growth and expansion of the British Empire under her rule, with dramatic changes in British culture, industry, and technology. These changes had a significant influence on the development and spread of British coinage.

Victorian currency was minted throughout the world in countries such as India and Australia, as well as Britain. Every coin and portrait tells a unique story – from the ‘Young Head’ which depicted a promising Queen, right through to the ‘Old Head’ which represented an ageing but graceful monarch.

In this blog, we’ll explore the defining coins of Queen Victoria’s reign, as well as taking a look at the modern commemorative coins we see today, issued to celebrate one of Britain’s most influential monarchs.

The defining coins of Queen Victoria’s Reign

1838 Sovereign

1838 Sovereign

The first Sovereign of Queen Victoria’s rule was issued in 1838 with the popular Young Head portrait by William Wyon. The portrait had a particularly youthful look, one that was favoured by Victoria and contributed to the coin’s popularity throughout her reign. To this day, it is the longest a portrait has featured on our circulating coinage, having been issued on bronze coins up until 1895. The Young Head effigy is considered the most favoured portrait of Victoria’s coinage, undergoing only minor changes throughout its lifespan.

Godless Florin

1849 ‘Godless’ Florin

As part of the move towards decimalisation, a coin valued at 1/10th of a pound, the Florin, was introduced in 1849. It featured the Gothic Head portrait by William Wyon which would actually go on to be regarded as one of the most beautiful representations of the Victorian age. However, this coin failed to include the term ‘Dei Gratia’, which earned it the nickname of the Godless Florin. It was swiftly withdrawn from circulation after three years.  

Gothic Florin

Gothic Florin

The Gothic Florin was introduced as a replacement to the Godless Florin and contained a very similar design, but this coin included the term ‘Dei Gratia’. This particular portrait represents the revival of Gothic culture across Victorian life and draws its name from the distinct gothic font used for the inscription around the edge, and the intricate detail on the crown that Victoria wears, which is considered a numismatic masterpiece. As the second Florin to promote decimalisation, the Gothic Florin again failed to gain popularity but was minted for longer than its predecessor.

Click here to own a genuine Queen Victoria Silver Florin

1855 Sydney Sovereign

1855 Sydney Sovereign

As part of British imperial expansion, the Royal Mint opened a branch in Sydney and the first Sovereign was minted there in 1855. It had the word ‘Australia’ printed on the reverse and bore a small ‘S’ mintmark to distinguish it as having been minted in Australia.  This portrait was only ever seen on Australian coins, produced exclusively at the Sydney Mint for just 14 years. It depicted a younger queen with a sprig of banksia (an Australia plant) weaved into her hair, which gave it a distinct Australian feel.

Double Florin

Double Florin

The Double Florin, in another move towards decimalisation, was valued at 1/5th of a pound and pictured the Jubilee Head. The coin was only 2mm smaller than the Crown but valued at a Shilling less, making it difficult to distinguish between the two. Issued between 1887 and 1890, it is one of the shortest circulating coins in British history. The coin was famously nicknamed the ‘Barmaid’s Ruin’, as tavern maids mistook the coin for a Crown, causing the tavern to lose money and the maid to lose their job!

1901 Sovereign

1901 Sovereign

The final Sovereign of Queen Victoria’s rule depicted the Old Head portrait by Thomas Brock, showing an elegant Queen in her mourning attire. Victoria’s veil had become integral to her image since the death of her husband in 1861, right up until her final years. This is one of the most famous images of Victoria and features on the final sovereign of her reign, issued in 1901 at the end of the Victorian era and the start of a new century.

Modern commemorative coins

Almost 150 years after the birth of Queen Victoria and 120 years after the initial move towards decimalisation, the first decimal coins entered circulation in Britain. The 5p and 10p coins were released in 1968, followed by the 50p coin in 1969.

From the modern coinage we see today, two commemorative £5 coins have been issued in Queen Victoria’s honour.

Death of Queen Victoria 100th anniversary

2001 Queen Victoria £5

The death of Queen Victoria in January 1901 marked the end of an era which has left its mark on the modern world. Her reign was remarkable for the extraordinary progress in industry, technology, arts and sciences and the expansion of the British Empire. This coin was issued to mark 100 years since her death and the end of the Victorian era. The reverse by Mary Milner-Dickens reproduces the profile of Victoria by William Wyon against the background of the Crystal Palace exhibition of 1851.

Birth of Queen Victoria 200th anniversary

2019 Queen Victoria £5

Under Queen Victoria’s reign, The British Empire became a superpower during an era of peace and prosperity. Designed by John Bergdahl, the reverse of this coin, issued to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria, features a portrait of Queen Victoria with the dates 1819 – 2019 alongside a steam train, large sailing ship, telephone, and penny farthing. Each element appears in a mechanical circle to represent the incredible inventions of the Victorian period.

Of all the monarchs, Victoria’s reign seems to have captured the imagination of the public more than any other. The coins issued throughout her reign and into the modern age reflect her extraordinary life and rule.


Celebrate the 200th Anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria

This brand new UK £5 coin has been struck to a superior Brilliant Uncirculated quality and is protectively encapsulated in official Change Checker packaging to ensure that it is preserved for generations.

Click here to secure the coin for your collection