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The UK’s 12 sided £1 goes global!

Yesterday the Treasury announced that the UK’s 12 sided £1 coin would be going global, as overseas territories and Crown Dependencies will soon be able to create their own bespoke versions of the coin to replace the older £1 currently in circulation.

In 2017, the new Nations of the Crown 12 sided £1 made its UK debut, described by the Government as “the most secure of its kind in the world” due to the new design, featuring intermittent milled edges and micro-engraved denomination and year date which protects against criminals producing counterfeits copies. Before this, around 1 in every 30 round pound coins were in fact fakes.

 

The UK's 12 sided £1 goes global!

 

As many territories and dependencies currently circulate their own version of the older pound coin, they will now be able to protect their currency with this secure cutting edge technology. These coins will be produced by The Royal Mint to the same security standards as our UK coinage to thwart counterfeit activity.

The Nations of the Crown £1 was designed by 15-year-old David Pearce following a public competition in 2015. The design is made up of the English rose, the Welsh leek, the Scottish thistle and the Northern Irish shamrock emerging from one stem within a royal coronet to represent the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom. 

 

The UK's 12 sided £1 goes global!

 

The Treasury expects the new versions struck for overseas territories and Crown Dependencies to feature images celebrating their heritage, history and culture to symbolise the close links with the UK.

Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man all represent Crown Dependencies of the UK, whilst the UK overseas territories include Akrotiri and Dhekelia; Anguilla; British Antarctic Territory; Bermuda; British Indian Ocean Territory; British Virgin Islands; Cayman Islands; Falkland Islands; Gibraltar; Montserrat; St Helena and Dependencies (Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha); Turk and Caicos Islands; Pitcairn Island; and South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands.

Robert Jenrick, Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, said:“These new designs will reflect the rich and varying British communities across the world.”

Lord Ahmad, the overseas territories minister, said: “As well as helping to boost their identity, these new coins will also bring increased security to each of these economies.”

So Change Checkers from overseas territories and Crown Dependencies can look forward to the new coins being released soon, but what design do you think should be featured for each? Let us know in the comments below.

 


 

Is this the last Isle of Man Round Pound?

The UK's 12 sided £1 goes global!

In 2017 the Isle of Man released this Raven and Falcon Uncirculated £1 Coin and following the Treasury’s update, this could now be the very last Isle of Man Round Pound!

Click here to secure this coin for your collection >>

1 Comment

  1. Jim on January 8, 2019 at 8:51 am

    Look forward to seeing these local varieties but I do hope Guernsey, Jersey and Isle of Man will keep their £1 paper notes as well.

    Gibraltar seem to be first off the mark, already announcing a new style £1 to be issued to commemorate Brexit.

    As for the “Round Pound”: I was in Isle of Man last September and received lots of new 2018 dated £1 which may be the last year of issue. Gibraltar also continued minting a “Round Pound”, certainly up to 2017, with a 50th anniversary of the Gibraltar Referendum commemorative.

    The Treasury announcement simply provided a list of our “Overseas Territories”, which could be a bit misleading as a good proportion don’t use sterling. For instance Akrotiri and Dhekelia are enclaves on Cyprus and use the Euro, Bermuda uses Dollars and cents.

    Narrowing the list down to those Overseas Territories that use Sterling are:
    British Antarctic Territory; Falkland Islands; Gibraltar; St Helena and Dependencies (Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha); and South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands.