For the first time in 20 years, a brand new portrait of the Queen will be featured on Australia’s currency update.

Since her coronation in 1953, five effigies of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II have appeared on the obverse of Australian coins – creating a numismatic timeline which shows her changing profile over the years.

Previous effigies were designed by Mary Gillick (1953), Arnold Machin (1966), and Raphael Maklouf (1985), however since 1998, Australian coins have used the current effigy by Ian Rank-Broadley, except during 2000, when Royal Australian Mint designer Vladimir Gottwald’s effigy was used on the 50c Royal Visit coin. 

The inclusion of an effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse of Australia’s coinage is mandated by Regulation 4(c) of the Currency Regulations made under the Currency Act 1965.

This new effigy by Jody Clark marks the sixth update to the Queen’s portrait and is said to continue the story of her reign and lifetime, although you might notice something a little different about this updated design…

 

Sixth Coin Effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019 $1 Uncirculated Coin. Obverse featuring the new design, reverse showing the old. Credit: ramint.gov.au

 

Whilst continuing to depict Her Majesty facing to the right and wearing the diamond diadem crown, unusually this new image will break from the traditional UK design by also including the Queen’s shoulders and the Victorian coronation necklace.

Mr Clark is responsible for the UK’s most recent portrait of Her Majesty, updated in 2015 and selected by the Royal Mint Advisory Committee.

His designs have also featured on recent releases such as the Prince Harry and Meghan Markle wedding £5 and the Queen’s Beasts £5 coins.

Chief Executive of the Royal Australian Mint, says: “The transition to a new effigy on all Australian coinage will begin in 2019 and continue into 2020. Coins carrying previous portraits of the Queen will remain in circulation.”

 

Sixth Coin Effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019 $1 Packaging. Credit: ramint.gov.au

 

However there is some controversy surrounding this coinage update, as the Australian Republic Movement (ARM) continue their campaign to remove the Queen as head of state in Australia.

What are your thoughts on Australia’s new currency update and do you think the design is head and shoulders above the rest? Let us know in the comments below.

 


 

Secure the Australian Sixth Effigy coin for your collection!

 

Enter the new effigy era with this striking $1 coin. Click here to place your order >>

There is no doubt that the Beatrix Potter 50p’s have caused much excitement across the UK and we can see why they’re so popular.

Collectors all over the country are checking their change right now in an attempt to find the Peter Rabbit 50p coin and are sure to do the same when the other coins in the series are released into circulation.

BP Ebay

Ebay listing shows 2 x Circulated Peter Rabbit 50p’s sold for £31 + P&P

But the more collectors hoard these coins, the less likely you are to find one in circulation – some are selling online for 40 times their face value! 

What makes these 50p coins so special?

The unique theme of this collection has been the key to its undeniable success. 

ST Beatrix Potter 50p Coins with Books

Struck by The Royal Mint, this series of Beatrix Potter 50p’s celebrate the 150th anniversary of her birth. Designed by Emma Noble, these coins celebrate Beatrix Potter as the artist behind some of the  best-loved characters in children’s literature as well as some of the animals from her children’s tales.

Will these 50p’s disappear from circulation completely?

As the rest of the collection unfolds we will welcome three more familiar faces, Jemima-Puddle-Duck, Squirrel Nutkin and Mrs Tiggy-Winkle, who will appear on UK coins later in the year to complete this five piece series.

As the coins are so popular, we predict it won’t be long until they completely disappear from circulation.

We think every coin in the Beatrix Potter fifty pence series will be snapped up and will stay safely tucked away in the collections of Change Checkers all over the UK.

So if you do find one, make sure you keep it safe – a 50p Collecting revolution could be about to start!


BP TWClaim a FREE Mrs Tiggy-Winkle 50p with the Change Checker Collecting Pack

Secure yours now for just £4.99 (+p&p)

Not only is our Queen now the longest reigning monarch in British history, but today Her Majesty is celebrating her 92nd Birthday – the only British sovereign to reach this milestone.

To celebrate, we’ve put together a timeline of the most significant moments in history while looking through some of the coins that have adorned Her Majesty’s portraits through the years.

Elizabeth immediately became Queen after her father King George VI passed away. Her Coronation was delayed for 16 months because of a traditional period of mourning that follows the death of a Monarch. The first commemorative crown of her reign was designed by Gilbert Ledward and captured the hearts of the nation.

The first coins of Queen Elizabeth II’s reign featured the first portrait of Her Majesty by Mary Gillick. The portrait is remembered for reflecting the optimistic mood of the nation and was also used on coinage in many of the commonwealth countries.

In 1965, a crown was released by the Royal Mint which changed everything. This particular Crown is famous for being the first British coin to feature anyone outside the Royal Family – Sir Winston Churchill.

On Decimal Day, the UK and Ireland decimalised their currencies.  The new currency system meant that the pound would be divided into units of ten, including half, one, two, five and 50 pence.

The marriage of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip Mountbatten took place on the 20th November 1947 and in 1972, the couple celebrated 25 years together. The Royal Mint issued the first British coin to have a face value of 25p to mark their 25th Wedding Anniversary. 

The thirteenth Commonwealth Games were held in Edinburgh in 1986 which saw the striking of the very first commemorative £2 coin. Not only that, it was the first coin to commemorate a sport.

The very first bi-metallic coin was issued in 1997 – one year prior to the portrait change. This coin is the one and only year that Raphael Maklouf’s portrait appears on the bi-metallic £2 coin. His portrait features Queen Elizabeth II wearing a necklace, which earned the coin its unique status and nickname in the collecting world, the ‘Queen with a Necklace’ £2. 

2011 saw the introduction of a new design for the 1oz Silver Britannia who has a long standing history with British coinage. The coin features the 4th portrait by Ian Rank-Broadley which is regarded as being a realistic and mature representation of the Queen.

In 2015, British History was made as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II celebrated an incredible Royal milestone, becoming our longest reigning monarch. This remarkable £20 coin was issued in celebration and features all 5 portraits of Her Majesty. The obverse features the fifth portrait of Her Majesty as 2015 was the first year that the Jody Clark portrait was used on UK coinage.

To celebrate the 90th Birthday of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II a selection of brand new commemorative coins were issued. Designed by Christopher Hobbs, the coin depicts nine roses – one for each decade of her life as well as the number ’90’ in the centre.

2016 proved to be a significant year for collectors and the 90th Birthday celebrations were no exception. The coins that appeared throughout Her Majesty’s reign have proved to be very popular over the years and we’re sure the 90th Birthday commemorative coins will be favourites among collectors in years to come.

Own your own piece of numismatic history

Add the 2016 UK 90th Birthday CERTIFIED BU £5 to your collection today >>