Posts Tagged ‘£1’

Is this a new £1 minting ‘error’?!

Last year we reported on the ‘Dual-dated £1 coin error’ where the dates on the obverse and reverse were different, one reading 2016 and the other 2017.

Now another £1 coin ‘error’ has been discovered and this one is very interesting indeed! It would appear that a 12-sided £1 coin die has been struck on an old round £1 coin blank.

Error - Is this a new £1 minting 'error'?!

The latest £1 ‘error’ coin appears to be a 12-sided £1 die struck on an old round £1 coin base. (Image: Zeki Atma)

In the past week alone, we’ve seen 3 examples of this ‘error’ coin.

The first was from a Change Checker from Burnham-on-Sea who told us that they’d listed the coin on eBay. After receiving 22 bids, the coin sold for £205! 

One pound eBay - Is this a new £1 minting 'error'?!

One of the first examples of this ‘error’ coin has sold for £205 on eBay!

Another coin is being sold at an auction in London on Wednesday 21st February. The auctioneers, ‘Timeline’, who are based in Berkeley Square, describe the coin as an “exceptional modern rarity” and go on to say “…the coin is sure to attract much attention when it crosses the block later this year”.

one pound Auction - Is this a new £1 minting 'error'?!

Another example of this latest ‘error’ will be available to purchase at auction on the 21st February. (Image: Coin news)

The third report we have received was this morning from another Change Checker. Our advice to anybody who believes they have found this coin, or any other ‘error’ coins, would be to send the coin off to The Royal Mint Museum who offer a free verification service.

They will send the coin back to you with confirmation of their findings, which can take a few weeks depending on demand for the service. Here is the address:

Dr Kevin Clancy, Director of the Museum, The Royal Mint Museum, Llantrisant, Pontyclun, CF72 8YT

As yet, we have not seen proof that these coins have been verified by The Mint, so whilst they look genuine we will keep an open mind for the time being.

As usual, if you think you have found one of these coins or any other interesting ‘errors’, we’d love to hear from you.

It’s not just UK coins that could turn up in your change…

Coins from Crown dependencies and overseas British territories can sometimes make an unexpected appearance in our change.

They are identical in size, shape and weight to UK denominations which means they often find their way into tills and vending machines undetected.

Finding one in your change can be an annoyance on one hand as technically the coins are not legal tender in the UK. On the other hand, from a collecting point of view, new and interesting designs are always a bonus!

Here’s a look at our top 5 favourite coin designs that have been issued by Crown dependencies and overseas British territories since decimalisation:

Guernsey Freesia 329M 1 300x208 - It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

Guernsey Freesia Flowers 50p’s were only issued in sets in 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990 and 1992. They were issued into circulation in 1997.

This beautiful 50p from Guernsey features two crossed freesia flowers with ‘FIFTY PENCE’ and the date at the top and ’50’ below the design.

The obverse features David Maklouf’s portrait of Queen Elizabeth II with the lettering ‘Bailiwick of Guernsey’ above, and also a small Guernsey Coat of Arms to the left.

This addition on the obverse makes the Guernsey 50p stand out when compared to UK 50p coins.

This 50p has the pre-1997 specifications.

Guernsey Lily 1 448P 1 300x208 - It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

Guernsey Lily £1 issued in 1981.

Guernsey Lily £1 Coin

The Guernsey Lily £1 features the island’s Lily on the reverse, and the Guernsey Coat of Arms on the obverse.

This unusual obverse without the Queen’s head makes this particular coin stand out amongst other £1 coins, and makes it sought after by collectors.

Along with the UK, Guernsey withdrew their round £1 coins from circulation in October 2017.

Isle of Man Coins Certified BU 2 Pounds 300x208 - It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

Isle of Man Tower of Refuge £2 issued in 2017.

Isle of Man Tower of Refuge £2 

The Tower of Refuge is an important landmark on the Isle of Man. It was built in 1832 upon the reef on orders of Sir William Hillary, founder of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

The impressive tower with birds flying above it features on the reverse of this Isle of Man £2 coin. The obverse carries a new effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Jody Clark, this effigy being reserved for the Crown dependencies and Commonwealth countries.

Gib Candy Tuft 549L 1 300x208 - It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

The Gibraltar Candy Tuft Flowers 50p issued in 1988 is 7 times rarer than the 2009 Kew Gardens 50p.

Gibraltar Candytuft Flowers 50p

This 50p features the denomination surrounded by a crown of Gibraltar Candytuft flowers, known as ‘Iberis Gibraltarica’.

Iberis Gibraltarica is the national flower of Gibraltar and is the symbol of the Upper Rock Nature Reserve which covers 40% of the country’s land area. Gibraltar is the only place in Europe where it is found growing in the wild.

With a mintage of just 30,000 in 1988, this 50p is 7 times rarer than the UK’s rarest 50p  so is particularly scarce and sought after amongst collectors. This 50p has the pre-1997 specifications.

Jersey Resolute 809U 1 300x208 - It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

The Jersey Resolute £1 was issued in 1994, 1997,1998, 2003, 2005 and 2006.

Jersey Resolute £1

The Resolute vessel was built in 1877 in Jersey by Thomas Le Huguet and was owned by Captain George Noel. The ship was used for trade before it was wrecked during a hurricane on 29th August 1905 at Friars Cove off Newfoundland.

The design depicts a two-mastered topsail schooner Resolute ship and was first issued into circulation in Jersey in 1994.

To ensure their currency would not be left vulnerable to counterfeiters, Jersey withdrew their round £1 coins from circulation in October 2017.  

So have you come across any of these coin designs in your change or do you already collect coins from other countries? Let us know via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram or leave us a comment below.

With a much lower population than the UK, some of these coins that can be found in your change can be extremely rare, so it’s worth keeping hold of them.

You can see the selection of coins from Crown dependencies and overseas British territories we have available here >>

STOP: the five £1 coins you must NOT cash in!

There is only one month left until the Round £1 coins are demonetised and the public, now more than ever, are being encouraged to spend or return their coins to the banks.

However, there’s a few coins you definitely shouldn’t be cashing in. Here are the ones to look out for:

Scotland: Edinburgh City

edinburgh city c2a31 - STOP: the five £1 coins you must NOT cash in!

The Edinburgh City £1 Coin

The Edinburgh City £1 coin was released in 2011 with a mintage of just 935,000, making it the lowest Round Pound by 680,000!

Taking this into account, there’s no real surprise that this coin sits top of our Scarcity Index with a perfect score of 100.

Such is the rarity, only 17% of Change Checker users list having this coin in their collection.

This coin currently sells for between £12-£16.


Wales: Cardiff City

cardiff city c2a31 - STOP: the five £1 coins you must NOT cash in!

The Cardiff City £1 Coin

Another of the capital cities series, the Cardiff City £1 coin is definitely one to keep.

Released in 2011, this coin has a mintage of just 1,615,000 and is in 2nd position in our Scarcity Index with a very high score of 88.

This coin depicts the circular Coat of Arms of Cardiff as the principal focus to represent Wales.

This coin is worth between £11-£15.

England: London City

london city c2a31 - STOP: the five £1 coins you must NOT cash in!

The London City £1 Coin

The 3rd coin from the capital cities series that you should hold on to is the London City £1 coin. Interestingly, the Belfast City coin does not make our list.

Released in 2010, this coin has a mintage of 2,635,000, much higher than Edinburgh and Cardiff but low in comparison to other £1 coins.

London City scores an impressive 77/100 in our Scarcity Index.

This coin can sell for between £5-£8.

Scotland: Thistle and Bluebell

Thistle 278x300 - STOP: the five £1 coins you must NOT cash in!

Scotland: Thistle and Bluebell £1 coin

The Thistle and Bluebell £1 coin was released in 2014 as part of the floral emblems series.

It has a mintage figure of 5,185,000 and scores a 55 on our Scarcity Index, coming in 4th place.

This coin features a thistle alongside a bluebell to represent Scotland.

This is worth between £3-£5.

UK: Crowned Shield

crowned shield - STOP: the five £1 coins you must NOT cash in!

UK: Crowned Shield £1 coin

The UK Crowned Shield £1 coin was released way back in 1988, only 5 years after the Round £1 came into circulation.

Although it has a relatively low mintage figure of 7,118,825, this coin makes the list due to some interesting Change Checker App data.

It scores a 51 in our Scarcity Index but less than 1/4 of Change Checker users list having this coin in their collection and swap requests outnumber swap listings by 6 to 1!

This coin will sell for between £3-£5.50.

It’s worth noting that our valuations are based on coins that have recently sold on auction sites. The value of a coin depends on a number of factors including the coin’s condition.