Posts Tagged ‘mintage’

How rare is my £2 and how much is it worth?

Since the first very bi-metallic £2 coins were released back in 1998, there have been over 40 UK £2 coins in circulation! Many of these coins commemorate key moments in Britain’s history and heritage.

But with so many in circulation, how can you tell which are the ones to look for?

Luckily for you, we’ve done the leg work and compiled a number of resources to help you determine how rare your £2 coin is and how much it might be worth.

Mintages

A key tool for working out how rare your coin might be is our £2 mintage chart. Generally speaking, the lower the mintage, the rarer the coin and the harder it will be to find in circulation.

Here are the most up to date mintage charts for UK £2 coins in circulation, with the UK’s rarest circulation £2, the 2002 Commonwealth Games Northern Ireland sat in top spot with the lowest mintage figures of just 485,500.

We haven’t been able to include the 2017 Jane Austen £2 or the  WW1 Aviation £2 coins in our charts yet as the mintage figures are yet to be released, however you can view our previous £2 mintage figures here. There hasn’t been any feedback from Change Checkers finding these coins in circulation but we’re hoping they’ll turn up soon and do let us know if you find any in your change!

Click here to read more about the 50p mintage figures >> 

How rare is my £2 and how much is it worth?

eBay Tracker

To help you determine the value of your coin, we’ve created our eBay Tracker, which takes the last 9 sold prices achieved on eBay and gives you the median price achieved (rounded to the nearest 50p). By taking the median, rather than an average, we avoid skewing created by one or two excessive prices achieved.

Here’s the top 5 highest selling £2 coins from our eBay Tracker, with the Commonwealth Games Northern Ireland sitting on top spot as the highest selling £2followed by the Commonwealth Games England and Wales respectively. In 4th place is the 2017 Jane Austen £2. Mintage figures for this coin have not yet been released and collectors don’t seem to have found the coin in their change, which seems to have made the coin very popular to buy on eBay, but will you wait to find this coin when it enters circulation?

Click here to see our full eBay Tracker >>

How rare is my £2 and how much is it worth?

*Accurate as of June 2018

Scarcity Index

To give you a complete picture of how your coin compares to other £2 coins in circulation, we have combined the mintage information with two other key pieces of information to provide the Change Checker Scarcity Index:

  • How many of each design are listed as “collected” by Change Checkers, indicating the relative ease of finding a particular coin.
  • The number of times a design has been requested as a swap over the previous 3 months, showing the current level of collector demand.

Here’s our most recent Scarcity Index for £2 coins, with yet again the Commonwealth Games Northern Ireland coming in on top as the most scarce £2. Where does your £2 rank on the Scarcity Index?

See the full Index here >> 

How rare is my £2 and how much is it worth?

Hopefully these tools will enable you to get a more realistic picture of how rare your £2 is and how much it might be worth. Of course, these figures will change in time as the latest £2 coins are released into circulation, so stay up to date with all our latest coin news and information.

Have you found any rare coins in your change recently? Let us know in the comments below.


If you’re interested in coin collecting, our Change Checker web app is completely free to use and allows users to:

– Find and identify the coins in their pocket
– Collect and track the coins they have
– Swap their spare coins with other Change Checkers

How rare is my £2 and how much is it worth?

Sign up today at: www.changechecker.org/app

It’s not just UK coins that could turn up in your change…

Coins from Crown dependencies and overseas British territories can sometimes make an unexpected appearance in our change.

They are identical in size, shape and weight to UK denominations which means they often find their way into tills and vending machines undetected.

Finding one in your change can be an annoyance on one hand as technically the coins are not legal tender in the UK. On the other hand, from a collecting point of view, new and interesting designs are always a bonus!

Here’s a look at our top 5 favourite coin designs that have been issued by Crown dependencies and overseas British territories since decimalisation:

It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

Guernsey Freesia Flowers 50p’s were only issued in sets in 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990 and 1992. They were issued into circulation in 1997.

This beautiful 50p from Guernsey features two crossed freesia flowers with ‘FIFTY PENCE’ and the date at the top and ’50’ below the design.

The obverse features David Maklouf’s portrait of Queen Elizabeth II with the lettering ‘Bailiwick of Guernsey’ above, and also a small Guernsey Coat of Arms to the left.

This addition on the obverse makes the Guernsey 50p stand out when compared to UK 50p coins.

This 50p has the pre-1997 specifications.

Guernsey Lily £1 Coin

It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

Guernsey Lily £1 issued in 1981.

The Guernsey Lily £1 features the island’s Lily on the reverse, and the Guernsey Coat of Arms on the obverse.

This unusual obverse without the Queen’s head makes this particular coin stand out amongst other £1 coins, and makes it sought after by collectors.

Along with the UK, Guernsey withdrew their round £1 coins from circulation in October 2017.

Isle of Man Tower of Refuge £2 

It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

Isle of Man Tower of Refuge £2 issued in 2017.

The Tower of Refuge is an important landmark on the Isle of Man. It was built in 1832 upon the reef on orders of Sir William Hillary, founder of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

The impressive tower with birds flying above it features on the reverse of this Isle of Man £2 coin. The obverse carries a new effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Jody Clark, this effigy being reserved for the Crown dependencies and Commonwealth countries.

Gibraltar Candytuft Flowers 50p

It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

The Gibraltar Candy Tuft Flowers 50p issued in 1988 is 7 times rarer than the 2009 Kew Gardens 50p.

This 50p features the denomination surrounded by a crown of Gibraltar Candytuft flowers, known as ‘Iberis Gibraltarica’.

Iberis Gibraltarica is the national flower of Gibraltar and is the symbol of the Upper Rock Nature Reserve which covers 40% of the country’s land area. Gibraltar is the only place in Europe where it is found growing in the wild.

With a mintage of just 30,000 in 1988, this 50p is 7 times rarer than the UK’s rarest 50p  so is particularly scarce and sought after amongst collectors. This 50p has the pre-1997 specifications.

Jersey Resolute £1

It's not just UK coins that could turn up in your change...

The Jersey Resolute £1 was issued in 1994, 1997,1998, 2003, 2005 and 2006.

The Resolute vessel was built in 1877 in Jersey by Thomas Le Huguet and was owned by Captain George Noel. The ship was used for trade before it was wrecked during a hurricane on 29th August 1905 at Friars Cove off Newfoundland.

The design depicts a two-mastered topsail schooner Resolute ship and was first issued into circulation in Jersey in 1994.

To ensure their currency would not be left vulnerable to counterfeiters, Jersey withdrew their round £1 coins from circulation in October 2017.  

So have you come across any of these coin designs in your change or do you already collect coins from other countries? Let us know via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram or leave us a comment below.

With a much lower population than the UK, some of these coins that can be found in your change can be extremely rare, so it’s worth keeping hold of them.

You can see the selection of coins from Crown dependencies and overseas British territories we have available here >>

Revealed: The UK’s rarest £5 Coin

It has now been revealed that the UK has a new ‘rarest’ £5 coin!

The £5 coin that commemorates the last Stuart Queen,  has just become the rarest UK £5 coin – knocking the 2011 Prince Philip £5 off the top spot.

The £5 coin commemorates the 300th Anniversary of the death of Queen Anne – the first queen of Great Britain who left behind political stability and prosperity. The design bears an elegant portrait of Queen Anne, styled by Mark Richards FRBS as an eighteenth-century miniature.

It was likely to have been popular with historians when it was released in 2014 but just 12,181 of these coins were struck in Brilliant Uncirculated presentation packs making it the rarest UK £5 coin ever.

If you want to know exactly how rare your £5 coins are, you can read our previous blog here >>

Revealed: The UK's rarest £5 Coin

The 2014 Queen Anne £5 – the UK’s rarest £5 Coin

And the announcement of this coin as the UK’s new rarest £5 coin reiterates the point that a less interesting theme or design on a coin, can be a real hidden gem for coin collections.

Let me explain…

It’s obvious that popular coin issues create instant and on-going demand for a coin, but the same can be said for ‘less interesting’ coin designs. This is because the less coins that are sold, the lower the final number of units that are available to  future collectors.

Revealed: The UK's rarest £5 Coin

The 2011 Prince Philip 90th Birthday £5 has a mintage of just 18,730 and is now the 2nd rarest UK £5 Coin.

But whilst most collectors would shy away from unpopular themes, it is these very coins that are likely to become the most sought after in years to come. And this 2014 Queen Anne £5 is a prime example along with the 2011 Prince Philip £5 coin.

If you need any more reasons to start collecting £5 coins, you can read my previous blog ‘Why you should be collecting £5 coins’ here >>

The Prince Philip £5 coin is extremely sought after by collectors and is virtually impossible to get hold of on the secondary market, so it is very likely that the same will happen with the 2014 Queen Anne £5. In fact, sold listings on eBay show that the Prince Philip £5 coin regularly fetches in excess of £50.

So if you’re lucky enough to have the 2014 Queen Anne £5 coin in your collection, make sure you keep hold of it. Demand for this coin is likely to increase dramatically.  

And remember, when it comes to collecting, there is one fact which is always inevitable –the rarest coins are always in highest demand.


Unfortunately we do not have any 2014 Queen Anne £5 coins to offer you today but if you’re interested, the 2017 UK Prince Philip CERTIFIED BU £5 Coin is available to order.
Revealed: The UK's rarest £5 Coin

Could this new 2017 UK Prince Phillip coin have an even lower mintage?

Click here to secure yours >>