Posts Tagged ‘Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’

Why Australia’s new currency update is head and shoulders above the rest…

For the first time in 20 years, a brand new portrait of the Queen will be featured on Australia’s currency update.

Since her coronation in 1953, five effigies of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II have appeared on the obverse of Australian coins – creating a numismatic timeline which shows her changing profile over the years.

Previous effigies were designed by Mary Gillick (1953), Arnold Machin (1966), and Raphael Maklouf (1985), however since 1998, Australian coins have used the current effigy by Ian Rank-Broadley, except during 2000, when Royal Australian Mint designer Vladimir Gottwald’s effigy was used on the 50c Royal Visit coin. 

The inclusion of an effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse of Australia’s coinage is mandated by Regulation 4(c) of the Currency Regulations made under the Currency Act 1965.

This new effigy by Jody Clark marks the sixth update to the Queen’s portrait and is said to continue the story of her reign and lifetime, although you might notice something a little different about this updated design…

 

Why Australia's new currency update is head and shoulders above the rest...

Sixth Coin Effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019 $1 Uncirculated Coin. Obverse featuring the new design, reverse showing the old. Credit: ramint.gov.au

 

Whilst continuing to depict Her Majesty facing to the right and wearing the diamond diadem crown, unusually this new image will break from the traditional UK design by also including the Queen’s shoulders and the Victorian coronation necklace.

Mr Clark is responsible for the UK’s most recent portrait of Her Majesty, updated in 2015 and selected by the Royal Mint Advisory Committee.

His designs have also featured on recent releases such as the Prince Harry and Meghan Markle wedding £5 and the Queen’s Beasts £5 coins.

Chief Executive of the Royal Australian Mint, says: “The transition to a new effigy on all Australian coinage will begin in 2019 and continue into 2020. Coins carrying previous portraits of the Queen will remain in circulation.”

 

Why Australia's new currency update is head and shoulders above the rest...

Sixth Coin Effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019 $1 Packaging. Credit: ramint.gov.au

 

However there is some controversy surrounding this coinage update, as the Australian Republic Movement (ARM) continue their campaign to remove the Queen as head of state in Australia.

What are your thoughts on Australia’s new currency update and do you think the design is head and shoulders above the rest? Let us know in the comments below.

 


 

Secure the Australian Sixth Effigy coin for your collection!

 

Why Australia's new currency update is head and shoulders above the rest...

Enter the new effigy era with this striking $1 coin. Click here to place your order >>

A history of the £10 note…

The withdrawal date for the current paper £10 note is in less than one week’s time on Thursday 1st March.

The paper ‘Series E’ note has been in circulation, in some form, for the past 26 years. So, I thought it would be interesting to take a look back at the history of the £10 note and our journey begins 259 years ago in 1759…

 

A history of the £10 note...

In a recent poll conducted on our Facebook page, 40% of you said that you still have paper £10 notes. Although you can still exchange them at the Bank of England after the cut-off date, I would suggest exchanging them before the withdrawal date.

Some retailers, banks and building societies may still accept these notes; however this is at their discretion. To save yourself any potential hassle, once you’ve added one to your collection, go and spend or swap your notes at the bank.


The Change Checker Banknote Collecting Pack

A history of the £10 note...

The brand new Official Change Checker Banknote Collecting Pack is the perfect way for any change checker to start collecting banknotes or display an already growing collection.

To help get you started, this pack includes an original £1 banknote, issued more than 35 years ago, in mint uncirculated condition… absolutely FREE.

Don’t miss out on this brand new Banknote collecting pack, start your collection today >>

What are ‘The Queen’s Beasts’ and why do they feature on the new £5 coins?

In 2017, The Royal Mint revealed a series of brand new base metal UK £5 coins featuring an intriguing range of creatures called the ‘Queen’s Beasts’.

Today, the brand new coin in the collection, The Yale of Beaufort, has been released!

The Lion of England was the first coin in the series to be released and collector’s attention was soon captured as the use of a bullion coin design on a base metal coin was unprecedented.

However, the choice of designs is equally fascinating and I decided to explore the history of these beasts and find out exactly why they were chosen to feature on our new £5 coins.

What are 'The Queen's Beasts' and why do they feature on the new £5 coins?

Why “The Queen’s Beasts”?

Over 400 years ago Henry VIII commissioned the sculpting of 10 heraldic animal statues. They were produced to represent the ancestry of King Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour. These became known as “The King’s Beasts” and can still be seen to this day, guarding the main entrance to Hampton Court Palace.

In 1952, in preparation for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, sculptor Sir James Woodford was tasked to create ten new statues, similar to “The King’s Beasts” but more suited to the Queen. Woodford was instructed not to produce exact replicas to those at Hampton Court Palace as some of them would have had little connection with Her Majesty’s own family or ancestry.

What are 'The Queen's Beasts' and why do they feature on the new £5 coins?

The King’s Beasts guarding the main entrance at Hampton Court Palace

As the Queen arrived for her coronation at Westminster Abbey, she was greeted by 10 six-foot tall beasts each representing a different part of her genealogy and thus “The Queen’s Beasts” were born.

What are 'The Queen's Beasts' and why do they feature on the new £5 coins?

Sir James Woodford carving The Lion Of England

The 10 beasts were made up of ‘The Lion of England’, ‘The White Greyhound of Richmond’, ‘The Yale of Beaufort’, ‘The Red Dragon of Wales’, ‘The White Horse of Hanover’, ‘The White Lion of Mortimer’, ‘The Unicorn of Scotland’, ‘The Griffin of Edward III’, ‘The Black Bull of Clarence’ and ‘The Falcon of the Plantagenets’.

After the coronation, the beasts were offered to Canada as a gift. The Canadian government accepted and the beasts can still be seen today on display in the Canadian Museum of History.

What are 'The Queen's Beasts' and why do they feature on the new £5 coins?

The 10 Queen’s Beasts (Image: The Royal Mint)

The Queen’s Beasts in modern culture

Still to this day, the Queen’s Beasts play a hugely important part in British culture, in particular The Lion of England and The Unicorn of Scotland.

For example, they feature in the logos of some of our country’s most famous and important institutions, most notably The Royal Arms, 10 Downing Street and Buckingham Palace.

What are 'The Queen's Beasts' and why do they feature on the new £5 coins?

The Queen’s Beasts play an important role in modern culture

Now that you know about the history of these heraldic creatures, take a look around and you’ll be surprised how often you see them being used in everyday life.


Two of the ‘beasts’ have now been released in 2019 – the Falcon of the Plantagenets and the Yale of Beaufort, by well-known designer Jody Clark.

You can now own the sixth coin in the series – the Yale of Beaufort.

These £5 coins have been struck to a superior Brilliant Uncirculated condition, ensuring their quality is perfect for you to add to your collection. They also come protectively encapsulated in official Change Checker packaging to preserve for generations to come.

See all of the Queen’s Beasts coins here >>